Laramie Child Custody Lawyer, Wyoming


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Galen Bruce Woelk

Criminal, Estate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rennie Phillips Polidora

Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, Misdemeanor, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Rennie P. Phillips

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, DUI-DWI, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

William L. Hiser

Real Estate, Trusts, Family Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years
Speak with Lawyer.com

Carrie R. Hesco

Lawsuit & Dispute, Immigration, Estate, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Craig Clinton Cook

Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Dona Playton

Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Erik Johannes Oblasser

Family Law, Child Custody, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jared Scott Crecelius

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Jennifer Marie Curran

Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Laramie Child Custody Lawyers and Laramie Child Custody Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.