Lake Charles Misdemeanor Lawyer, Louisiana


Daniel L. Lorenzi Lawyer

Daniel L. Lorenzi

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Estate

Our Lake Charles law firm of Lorenzi & Barnatt was founded in 1990 by attorney Thomas Lorenzi, who has practiced law for more than 30 years. Mr. Lo... (more)

Tara B. Hawkins Lawyer

Tara B. Hawkins

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury

At HAWKINS LEGAL, principal attorney Tara Bell Hawkins, offers experienced and aggressive representation for people facing serious criminal charges, f... (more)

David  Green Lawyer

David Green

VERIFIED
Criminal, Family Law, Personal Injury

David Green is a graduate of McNeese State University and has a strong background in law enforcement and criminal law. While earning his undergraduat... (more)

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800-930-6250

David Brian Green Lawyer

David Brian Green

Criminal, Family Law, Personal Injury
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Jamie B. Bice

Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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P. David Olney

Wills & Probate, Traffic, Collection, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Walter Marshall Sanchez

Family Law, Internet, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anthony J. Hebert

Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Car Accident, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

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Thomas Lawrence Lorenzi

Felony, White Collar Crime, Grand Jury Proceedings, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Roger G. Burgess

Litigation, Admiralty & Maritime, Criminal, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

BURGLARY

The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need no... (more...)
The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need not be theft. For instance, someone would be guilty of burglary if he entered a house through an unlocked door in order to commit a murder.

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