La Crosse Adoption Lawyer, Wisconsin, page 2


Daniel C. Skemp

Landlord-Tenant, Dispute Resolution, Employment Discrimination, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  52 Years

Kimberly A. Henderson

Divorce & Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Slip & Fall Accident, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Kimberly Ann Henderson

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Ann I. Brandau

Lawsuit & Dispute, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years
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Brent Phillip Smith

Dispute Resolution, Employment Discrimination, Divorce, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anthony R. Gingrasso

Landlord-Tenant, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

James D. Thibodeau

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Civil & Human Rights, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Brandon J. Prinsen

Real Estate, Estate, Divorce, Identity Theft, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura J. Seaton

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sean William O'Neill

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME

An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median fam... (more...)
An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median family income figures for each state and for different family sizes. A debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income in his or her state must pass the means test in order to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must commit all disposable income to a five-year repayment plan if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Godoy ex rel. Gramling v. EI du Pont de Nemours & Co.

... 690 The Restatement (Third) imposes liability "when the foreseeable risk of harm could have been reduced or avoided by the adoption of a reasonable alternative design[.]" Id. § 2(b). ¶ 61 The Restatement (Third)'s approach remains controversial. ...

IN THE MATTER OF ADOPTION OF ELIZABETH AK

¶ 4 While this court is a grandparent and has empathy for Elizabeth, who it believes to be a loving grandmother, it is required to follow the statutes, Hamilton v. Hamilton, 2003 WI 50, ¶45, 261 Wis. 2d 458, 661 NW2d 832 (an appellate court is bound by clear language of a statute), ...

IN RE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO JESSE E.

... Crystal argues that the court failed to adequately consider the likelihood of Jesse's adoption after termination and whether Jesse has a substantial relationship with her. See § 48.426(3)(a) and (c). ... 2d 34, 39, 349 NW2d 716 (Ct. App. 1984). Likelihood Of Adoption Factor. ...