Kilauea Criminal Lawyer, Hawaii


Alfred B. Castillo

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bentley C. Adams

Federal Appellate Practice, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Bentley C. Adams

Other, Federal Appellate Practice, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Craig Anthony De Costa

Juvenile Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years
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Craig Anthony De Costa

Other, Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel Guy Hempey

Power of Attorney, Other, Motor Vehicle, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Dorothy Elizabeth Heim

Criminal, Corporate, Contract, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Glen T. Hale

Landlord-Tenant, Estate, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory Howard Meyers

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Jed Somit

Construction, Criminal, Insurance
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  45 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT

The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced '... (more...)
The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced 'to a moral certainty.' The jury must be convinced that the defendant committed each element of the crime before returning a guilty verdict.

ARRAIGNMENT

A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters... (more...)
A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters often handled at the arraignment are arranging for the appointment of a lawyer to represent the defendant and the setting of bail.

PROSECUTE

When a local District Attorney, state Attorney General or federal United States Attorney brings a criminal case against a defendant.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Pond

... A person commits the offense of interference with reporting [sic] of an emergency or crime if that person intentionally or knowingly prevents a victim or witness to a criminal act from calling a 911-emergency telephone system, obtaining medical assistance, or making a report to a ...

State v. Souza

... taxable income of $61,204. After Souza filed his 1999 and 2000 Hawai`i income tax returns, he was contacted by Stephen Hironaka, a criminal tax investigator for the State Department of Taxation. Souza told Investigator Hironaka ...

Styke v. Sotelo

... relationship. On April 1, 2007, a physical altercation ensued between Styke, who was pregnant, and Sotelo (April 1, 2007, incident), which resulted in Sotelo being arrested and charged in a separate criminal case. Thereafter ...