Indianapolis Wills & Probate Lawyer, Indiana, page 3


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

Robert D. Wickens

Agriculture, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Robert C. Thompson

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           

Barbara Jane Baird

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Estate, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Tracy N. Betz

Construction, Wills & Probate, White Collar Crime, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Christopher A. Pearcy

Wills, Trusts, Insurance, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

David E. Dearing

Land Use & Zoning, Eminent Domain, Real Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Douglas Paul Long

Health Care, Wills, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Richard Joseph Mcconnell

Employment, Administrative Law, Insurance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew W Hull

Government Agencies, Estate Administration, Employment, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Raymond Daniel Faust

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Civil Rights, Toxic Mold & Tort
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

CURATOR

See conservator.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

AB TRUST

A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of... (more...)
A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of the property goes to the beneficiaries named in the trust -- commonly, the grown children of the couple -- with the crucial condition that the surviving spouse has the right to use the property for life and is entitled to any income it generates. The surviving spouse may even be allowed to spend principal in certain circumstances. When the surviving spouse dies, the property passes to the trust beneficiaries. It is not considered part of the second spouse's estate for estate tax purposes. Using this kind of trust keeps the second spouse's taxable estate half the size it would be if the property were left directly to the spouse. This type of trust is also known as a bypass or credit shelter trust.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Adoption of HNPG

... II. Whether the probate court abused its discretion when it admitted deposition testimony of HNPG's mother over Blake's objection; and,. III. ... On February 23, 2007, the probate court issued findings of fact and conclusions of law and found in pertinent part: ...

In re Estate of Eguia

... Telez appeals the probate court's determination that Esther Eguia, Eleazar Gracia, and Mary Jane Gracia are the trustees of the Sociedad and are entitled in that capacity to receive the property left to the Sociedad. ... Telez opened a probate case on July 11, 2005. ...

First Farmers Bank & Trust Co. v. Whorley

... On January 24, 2002, Zehring passed away and a probate estate was opened on February 7, 2002. ... The next day, the trial court terminated First Farmers' guardianship and First Farmers was appointed executor and personal representative of the probate estate. ...