Hingham Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Massachusetts

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Christopher E. Sawin Lawyer

Christopher E. Sawin

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Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Criminal

Christopher E. Sawin is Founder and Principle Attorney of Sawin Law, P.C., where he concentrates his practice in family law, probate, estate planning,... (more)

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Steven  Rosenberg Lawyer

Steven Rosenberg

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Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Employment, Business, Real Estate

A member of the Massachusetts Bar for more than 30 years, Attorney Steven Rosenberg concentrates his practice counseling and representing small and me... (more)

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William Kevin Brown Lawyer

William Kevin Brown

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Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, Landlord-Tenant, Business & Trade, Real Estate
We handle all types domestic relations personal injury, landlord/tenant and business litigation

The Law Office of William K. Brown is a general practice firm that serves the varied needs of our clients. Our attorneys are well versed in many areas... (more)

Joseph F. McDonough

Child Support, Consumer Protection, Criminal, DUI-DWI
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Stanley Kroll

Mediation, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Custody & Visitation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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Wayne V. Gilbert

Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Estate, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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Josey Lyne Payne

Personal Injury, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
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Jessica Ann Foley

DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Criminal
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Gail Otis

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Kimberly G Granatino

Divorce & Family Law
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LEGAL TERMS

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.