Hillside Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Colorado


Grant William Lewis

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

David Brown

Traffic, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

David Brown

Traffic, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Anna Hall Owen

Family Law, Juvenile Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years
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Joanna K. Smith

Agriculture, Family Law, Elder Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Jolene Lynn DeVries

Juvenile Law, Trusts, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Vaughn L. McClain

Bankruptcy, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Bruce Johnson

Real Estate, Employment, Family Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  59 Years

Zachary Cordova

Employment, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ernest Frank Marquez

Civil Rights, DUI-DWI, Family Law, Traffic, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

ISSUE

A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called... (more...)
A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called 'lineal descendants.'

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.