Gulfport Felony Lawyer, Mississippi

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Carolyn Ann McAlister Lawyer

Carolyn Ann McAlister

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Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Estate, Immigration

Carolyn Geary is a practicing attorney in the state of Mississippi. She received her J.D. from University of Mississippi. She has been practicing law... (more)

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800-939-9280

Rob  Curtis Lawyer

Rob Curtis

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Divorce & Family Law

Rob Curtis is a practicing lawyer serving Gulfport, MS and the surrounding area.

Susan Taylor Smith Lawyer

Susan Taylor Smith

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Accident & Injury

Susan Taylor is a general practice lawyer proudly serving Gulfport, Mississippi and the neighboring communities.

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800-936-8490

Scott D Smith Lawyer

Scott D Smith

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Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Estate, Landlord-Tenant

Scott D. Smith, Attorney at Law, PLLC is a full service law firm established to assist clients in almost all aspects of legal counsel needs. Our firm... (more)

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W. Fred Hornsby Lawyer

W. Fred Hornsby

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Estate, Accident & Injury

W. F. "Dub" Hornsby, III, is a lifetime resident of Biloxi. A graduate of Mercy Cross High School, Mississippi State University and the University of ... (more)

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800-890-6991

Rita Nahlik Silin Lawyer

Rita Nahlik Silin

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Criminal, Adoption, Paternity

At Silin Law Firm PLLC in Ocean Springs, you will find an attorney with a thorough knowledge of the laws and the courts, along with empathy and honest... (more)

W. Edward Hatten

Alcoholic Beverages, Dispute Resolution, Arbitration, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jon Stuart Tiner

Administrative Law, Antitrust, Criminal, Aviation
Status:  In Good Standing           

R. Wayne Woodall

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Walter W. Dukes

Complex Litigation, Criminal, Defamation & Slander, Asbestos & Mesothelioma
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

PUBLIC DEFENDER

A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and ar... (more...)
A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and are unable to pay for their own defense.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.

CONSTABLE

A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers and keep t... (more...)
A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers and keep the peace. Depending on the state, a constable may be similar to a marshal or sheriff.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'