Greenville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, South Carolina


Lloyd Wayne Patterson Lawyer

Lloyd Wayne Patterson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Estate, Car Accident, Traffic

I have over forty five years of business and legal experience. Prior to entering law, I owned and managed corporations involved in various fields of t... (more)

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CONTACT

800-779-0940

W. Chris Castro Lawyer

W. Chris Castro

VERIFIED
Criminal, Business, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute
Fighting for Your Rights.

Attorney W. Chris Castro is a solo practitioner and the founder of the Castro Law Firm, LLC located in Greenville, South Carolina. His practice prima... (more)

Ronald S. Clement Lawyer

Ronald S. Clement

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Personal Injury, Criminal

For 39 years, attorney Ronald S. Clement has been helping his clients overcome legal difficulties in South Carolina. His professional approach is to s... (more)

W. D. Yarborough Lawyer

W. D. Yarborough

VERIFIED
Divorce, Criminal, Elder Law, Medical Malpractice, Estate

W. D. Yarborough has been licensed to practice law for 46 years. He graduated from Furman University in 1967, and the University of South Carolina in ... (more)

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Joseph S. Lyles Lawyer

Joseph S. Lyles

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Environmental Law, Business

Unlike other lawyers, I have lots of trial experience. Although I settle most of the cases I handle, I know how to take them to court so a jury or jud... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

864-834-8111

David Arthur Braghirol Lawyer

David Arthur Braghirol

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI

David Braghirol is a practicing attorney in the state of South Carolina. He graduated from University of South Carolina with his J.D. in 1997. He curr... (more)

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CONTACT

800-296-8980

Jamie DeMint

Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jefferson G. Wood

Criminal, Family Law, Insurance, Personal Injury, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

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W Marsh Robertson

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas T. Hodges

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Greenville Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Greenville Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER (TRO)

An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court ... (more...)
An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court holds a second hearing where the other side can tell his story and the court can decide whether to make the TRO permanent by issuing an injunction. Although a TRO will often not stop an enraged spouse from acting violently, the police are more willing to intervene if the abused spouse has a TRO.

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

QUALIFIED MEDICAL CHILD SUPPORT ORDER (QMSCO)

A court order that provides health benefit coverage for the child of the noncustodial parent under that parent's group health plan.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.