Green Bay Estate Lawyer, Wisconsin


Alf  Langan Lawyer

Alf Langan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Criminal, Federal, Tax Litigation
Licensed in Wisconsin, Illinois, Federal Eastern District of Wisconsin, and U.S. Tax Court

Mr. Langan is a Criminal Lawyer serving Green Bay, Wisconsin and the surrounding areas. He has been practicing law for over 20 years.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-382-0901

Matthew L. Goldin Lawyer

Matthew L. Goldin

VERIFIED
Criminal, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Traffic, Litigation

Matthew Goldin has been practicing law since 1991 and has handled thousands of cases, including homicides, sexual assault cases, drunk driving cases, ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-989-4240

Philip R. Brehm

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Family Law, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Timothy Polack

Corporate, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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CONTACT
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Michael R. McCanna

Arbitration, Corporate, Environmental Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Don R. Herrling

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Roger W. Clark

Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Gregory John Babcock

Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Employment, Estate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Thomas J. Parins

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Curtis Czachor

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Green Bay Estate Lawyers and Green Bay Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

MARITAL LIFE ESTATE TRUST

See AB trust.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

BYPASS TRUST

A trust designed to lessen a family's overall estate tax liability. An AB trust is the most popular kind of bypass trust.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

INTESTATE

The condition of dying without a valid will. The probate court appoints an administrator to distribute the deceased person's property according to state law.