Gillette DUI-DWI Lawyer, Wyoming

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Carol Jean Seeger

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

C. John Cotton

Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Paul Sanford Phillips

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Patrick G. Davidson

Corporate, Civil Rights, Commercial Real Estate, Contract, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years
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Ralph W. Boynton

Real Estate, Traffic, Lawsuit & Dispute, Patent
Status:  Retired           Licensed:  46 Years

Cotton

Traffic, Workers' Compensation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carly Kim Anderson

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Jesse James Hardy

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Elizabeth Bellamy Grill

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

Anne Karen Kugler

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

IRRESISTIBLE IMPULSE TEST

A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his ac... (more...)
A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his actions were wrong.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

LINEUP

A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the c... (more...)
A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the crime scene. The police are supposed to choose similar-looking people to appear with the suspect. If the suspect alone matches the physical description of the perpetrator, evidence of the identification can be attacked at trial. For example, if the robber is described as a Latino male, and the suspect, a Latino male, is placed in a lineup with ten white males, a witness' identification of him as the robber will be challenged by the defense attorney.