Frederick Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Maryland, page 5


Claudia Elaine Haywood

Copyright, Federal, Employment Discrimination, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

William Segal

Family Law, Employment, Personal Injury, Social Security
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Brian David Wise

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lucien T Winegar

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years
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Jennifer Lynn Leatherman

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Jennifer Leigh Rankin

Juvenile Law, Education, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

W. Steve Paleos

Foreclosure, Bankruptcy, Traffic, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Victor Edward Cretella

Construction, Family Law, Employment, Intellectual Property
Status:  In Good Standing           

Matthew Charles Koning

Employment, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Cheryl Lynn Chado

Family Law, Juvenile Law, Mediation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.

ADULTERY

Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are ra... (more...)
Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are rarely prosecuted for it. In states that have retained fault grounds for divorce, adultery is always sufficient grounds for a divorce. In addition, some states alter the distribution of property between divorcing spouses in cases of adultery, giving less to the 'cheating' spouse.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.