Fort Wayne Felony Lawyer, Indiana


Michael Richard McEntee Lawyer

Michael Richard McEntee

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Wills & Probate
General Practice and Workers Compensation since 1977

My name is Mike McEntee and I have been practicing law in Fort Wayne for over thirty years. I was born and raised here and my three children all went ... (more)

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800-782-2061

Megan Lynn Close Lawyer

Megan Lynn Close

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Traffic, Employment

Megan Close is a dedicated individual who commits her life and practice to the service of others. If you are looking for someone who you can trust, lo... (more)

Chad E. Kukelhan

Adoption, Animal Bite, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Aaron J Butler

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Michael T. Douglass

Family Law, Child Support, Adoption, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jeff Terrill

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Suzanne M. Wagner

Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory A. Miller

Motor Vehicle, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

John Robert Watkins

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Benjamin Eugene Nordmann

Juvenile Law, Landlord-Tenant, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.