Fort Wayne Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Indiana

Sponsored Law Firm


Megan Lynn Close Lawyer

Megan Lynn Close

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Traffic, Employment

Megan Close is a dedicated individual who commits her life and practice to the service of others. If you are looking for someone who you can trust, lo... (more)

Stucky, Lauer & Young,  LLP Lawyer

Stucky, Lauer & Young, LLP

Divorce & Family Law, Mediation, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute, Car Accident

The lawyers of Stucky, Lauer & Young, LLP, a Fort Wayne law firm founded in 1957, strive to provide the highest quality, yet affordable and accessible... (more)

J. Brian Tracey Lawyer

J. Brian Tracey

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Traffic

J. Brian Tracey is a practicing lawyer in the state of Indiana.

Michael Richard McEntee Lawyer

Michael Richard McEntee

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Wills & Probate
General Practice and Workers Compensation since 1977

My name is Mike McEntee and I have been practicing law in Fort Wayne for over thirty years. I was born and raised here and my three children all went ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-782-2061

Speak with Lawyer.com
Joshua Daniel Byanski Lawyer

Joshua Daniel Byanski

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Accident & Injury, Business

Joshua Daniel Byanski is a practicing lawyer in the state of Indiana.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-663-0170

Duane J. Snow

Adoption, Corporate, Business Organization, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Suzanne M. Wagner

Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ann M. Trzynka

Social Security -- Disability, Wills, Wills & Probate, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Mark C. Chambers

Complex Litigation, Family Law, Banking & Finance, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey P. Smith

Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Fort Wayne Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Fort Wayne Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER (TRO)

An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court ... (more...)
An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court holds a second hearing where the other side can tell his story and the court can decide whether to make the TRO permanent by issuing an injunction. Although a TRO will often not stop an enraged spouse from acting violently, the police are more willing to intervene if the abused spouse has a TRO.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

GUARDIAN OF THE ESTATE

Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guar... (more...)
Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guardian of the estate may also be called a 'property guardian' or 'financial guardian.' See also guardian.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.