Fort Howard DUI-DWI Lawyer, Maryland

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Patrick  Preller Lawyer

Patrick Preller

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Employment Discrimination, Traffic

The Law Office of Patrick S. Preller is dedicated to serving both the community of Baltimore as well as the residents of the State of Maryland. With ... (more)

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Phillip  Chalker Lawyer

Phillip Chalker

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI, Real Estate, Estate, Motor Vehicle

Phillip Chalker graduated from the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. After law school, Mr. Chalker worked for the Social Secur... (more)

Brett M. Schaffer

Leisure, Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Caroline M. Kang

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Henry J. Wegrocki

Traffic, Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Isaac Klein

Traffic, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Car Accident
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Mark A. Snyder

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Patricia M. Cochran

Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andy White

DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anna Zappulla Skelton

Real Estate, Litigation, DUI-DWI, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.

LINEUP

A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the c... (more...)
A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the crime scene. The police are supposed to choose similar-looking people to appear with the suspect. If the suspect alone matches the physical description of the perpetrator, evidence of the identification can be attacked at trial. For example, if the robber is described as a Latino male, and the suspect, a Latino male, is placed in a lineup with ten white males, a witness' identification of him as the robber will be challenged by the defense attorney.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

HOT PURSUIT

An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and a... (more...)
An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and an officer has chased a suspect to a private house, the officer can forcefully enter the house in order to prevent the suspect from escaping or hiding or destroying evidence.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Turner v. State

... driving while intoxicated" (DWI), is now called "driving under the influence of alcohol" (DUI). Id. Likewise, the offense, formerly called "driving under the influence of alcohol" (DUI), is now called "driving while impaired" (DWI). Id. ...

Attorney Grievance Comm. v. Tanko

... "The Respondent ... testified [that] he knew in DUI/DWI cases licenses were taken by police officers and mailed back to the MVA. However, his defense is he was not arrested for DUI or DWI, but rather for a marijuana charge. ...

Washington v. State

... 2]. Whether the imposition of consecutive sentences upon conviction of DUI and DUI per se is permitted. ... Trans. § 21-902(a)(2). He argues that the DUI per se sentence should have been merged into the DUI sentence because. ...