Federal Way Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Washington

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Joshua R. Brumley Lawyer

Joshua R. Brumley

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI, Business

Joshua (or Josh) is a Washington State native, raised around the Seattle Tacoma area. Having graduated from the University of Washington, Josh earned ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-726-6691

Jason  Newcombe Lawyer

Jason Newcombe

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury, Traffic

From our offices in Seattle and throughout the state of Washington, we help families solve difficult legal problems and move on with their lives. ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-699-2370

Leslie R. Bottimore Lawyer

Leslie R. Bottimore

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute

Skilled attorney with more than 15 years of experience effectively helping clients Bottimore & Associates, P.L.L.C. in Tacoma, Washington represent... (more)

Arthur Colby Parks Lawyer

Arthur Colby Parks

VERIFIED
Estate, Power of Attorney, Corporate Governance, Elder Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships

I have lived in Tacoma for over 25 years. My wife is a school teacher in our neighborhood and we have raised our three daughters here. I believe in Ta... (more)

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CONTACT

800-793-7250

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Howard  Comfort Lawyer

Howard Comfort

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI

Howard Comfort is a practicing lawyer in the state of Washington.

Rachel Rolfs

Dispute Resolution, Family Law, Divorce, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bruce Clement

Divorce & Family Law, Slip & Fall Accident, Personal Injury, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  52 Years

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Thomas B. Vertetis

Government Agencies, Family Law, Products Liability, Medical Malpractice, Mass Torts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Raphael Igwens Nwokike

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Civil Rights, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Janal M Rich

Traffic, Dispute Resolution, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.