Elko Trusts Lawyer, Nevada


Richard Gridley Barrows Lawyer

Richard Gridley Barrows

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Business Organization

Richard G. Barrows is a partner at Wilson Barrows Salyer and Jones. Mr. Barrows holds a Juris Doctorate and a B.S. in Business – both from Arizona S... (more)

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800-939-8160

Robert J. Wines

Real Estate, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eric Michael Morley

Commercial Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Government, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Zachary A. Gerber

Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate, Business, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years
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John E. Marvel

Real Estate, Government, Estate, Environmental Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Barbara Gallagher

Wills & Probate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert M. Salyer

Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Gregory Duane Corn

Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert Brian Goicoechea

Government, Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Barbara Inama Inama-torvinen

Government, Estate, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

ESTATE PLANNING

The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your... (more...)
The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your estate may involve making a will, living trust, healthcare directives, durable power of attorney for finances or other documents.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

HOLOGRAPHIC WILL

A will that is completely handwritten, dated and signed by the person making it. Holographic wills are generally not witnessed. Although it's legal in many stat... (more...)
A will that is completely handwritten, dated and signed by the person making it. Holographic wills are generally not witnessed. Although it's legal in many states, making a holographic will is never advised except as a last resort.

REMAINDERMAN

Someone who will inherit property in the future. For instance, if someone dies and leaves his home 'to Alma for life, and then to Barry,' Barry is a remainderma... (more...)
Someone who will inherit property in the future. For instance, if someone dies and leaves his home 'to Alma for life, and then to Barry,' Barry is a remainderman because he will inherit the home in the future, after Alma dies.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

CHARITABLE TRUST

Any trust designed to make a substantial gift to a charity and also achieve income and estate tax savings for the person who creates the trust (the grantor).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Hartford Fire Ins. Co. v. TRUSTEES OF CONST. INDUS.

... employees' union. After the subcontractor failed to pay employee-benefit contributions owed to the trusts, the trusts' trustees sued, in federal court, the general contractor and its surety to recover the unpaid contributions. The ...

IN MATTER OF ORPHEUS TRUST

... It is one of several successor trusts to the historic John Paul Getty Family Trust created in California in 1934. ... DISCUSSION. In 2003, the Nevada Legislature enacted certain provisions of the Uniform Principal and Income Act, which govern the administration of trusts. ...

Waldman v. Maini

... While in some instances a corporation may acquire equitable ownership of a life insurance policy through such remedies as constructive and resulting trusts, the facts of this case do not support the imposition of those equitable remedies. ...