Eau Claire Child Support Lawyer, Wisconsin


Mandy L. Caffee Lawyer

Mandy L. Caffee

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Guardianships & Conservatorships, DUI-DWI, Child Support

Mandy Caffee founded Caffee Law Office in Eau Claire with the goal of providing trusted local advocacy to the community. With the belief that everyone... (more)

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Michael R. Cohen

Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Charles G. Norseng

Real Estate, Motor Vehicle, Pension & Benefits, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

John D. Hibbard

Real Estate, Government, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  55 Years
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Pamela J. Veith

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Jack A. Postlewaite

Real Estate, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  55 Years

Heather Marie Hunt

Real Estate, Motor Vehicle, Pension & Benefits, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Richard A. Eaton

Divorce & Family Law, Business, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Emily Maeve Long

Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sharon L G McIlquham

Real Estate, Government, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

CONSUMMATION

The actualization of a marriage. Sexual intercourse is required to 'consummate' a marriage. Failure to do so is grounds for divorce or annulment.

COMPLAINT

Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states a... (more...)
Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states and in some types of legal actions, such as divorce, complaints are called petitions and the person filing is called the petitioner. To complete the initial stage of a lawsuit, the plaintiff's complaint must be served on the defendant, who then has the opportunity to respond by filing an answer. In practice, few lawyers prepare complaints from scratch. Instead they use -- and sometimes modify -- pre-drafted complaints widely available in form books.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

AccuWeb, Inc. v. Engstrom

... Consequently, they argue that the circuit court and the court of appeals did not err in rejecting the conclusions in the Mesirow Report because, under Wisconsin law, the potential for an injury is not sufficient to support a claim by a plaintiff for damages. ...

MATTER OF DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS AGAINST BERLIN

... to the May 2002 automobile accident. ¶ 9 On April 29, 2005, the Milwaukee County Child Support Agency filed four claims against DB's estate for unpaid child support obligations totaling $126,200.28. ¶ 10 On or about May 24 ...

Christensen v. Sullivan

... In Griffin v. Reeve, 141 Wis.2d 699, 416 NW2d 612 (1987), the court held that contempt was an appropriate remedy for a court to utilize to enforce past due child support payments after the child has reached majority. Id. at 704, 416 NW2d 612. ...