Dover Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, New Hampshire


Heath Norris

Criminal, Divorce, Family Law, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Don Nary

Family Law, Wills, Traffic, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Eric Schlapak

Consumer Protection, Divorce, Education, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Leslie M. Leonard

Litigation, Social Security -- Disability, Estate Planning, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

John P. Sherman

Eminent Domain, Labor Law, Family Law, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Celeste M Christo

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Philip L. Pettis

Family Law, Labor Law, Corporate, Estate Planning, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Laurie A. Lacoste

Eminent Domain, Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Jay Nadeau

Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Wrongful Death, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Alexander G. Nossiff

Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, Business, Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Dover Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Dover Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.