Dallas Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Texas

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Kimberly Vermillion Wright Lawyer

Kimberly Vermillion Wright

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate

I am an experienced litigator and advocate. My direct approach and prompt communication have earned me the trust of my clients and the respect of my p... (more)

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800-932-7161

Andrew Vincent Howard Lawyer

Andrew Vincent Howard

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Andrew Howard is a practicing attorney in the state of Texas specializing in Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, and Criminal Defense. Mr. Howard... (more)

Mark Rush Williamson Lawyer

Mark Rush Williamson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Paternity, Child Custody, Divorce
Award Winning Dallas Divorce Attorney

We understand that you have a lot of choices when it comes to finding an attorney to represent you in your family law dispute. The attorneys at Willia... (more)

Jeffrey Owen Anderson Lawyer

Jeffrey Owen Anderson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support

Professional, yet approachable. Confident, yet easygoing. I will tenaciously represent you with honesty, integrity and empathy. I come from a family o... (more)

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Carin Paris Evans Lawyer

Carin Paris Evans

Accident & Injury, Family Law
Charles H. Robertson Lawyer

Charles H. Robertson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Charles Robertson earned his law degree from Southern Methodist University, is Board Certified in Family Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specializat... (more)

Kevin M. Duddlesten Lawyer

Kevin M. Duddlesten

VERIFIED
Employment, Medical Malpractice, Mediation, Employment Discrimination, Family Law

Kevin’s practice focuses largely on employment litigation and arbitration matters involving wage and hour disputes, enforcement and defense of viola... (more)

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CONTACT

800-803-0491

Julie E. Johnson Lawyer

Julie E. Johnson

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Car Accident, Wrongful Death, Personal Injury
Vehicle Accident, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, Brain Injury, Back, Neck Bone and Joint Injuries

Dallas personal injury attorney Julie Johnson has handled thousands of cases since 1991. Her Dallas-based practice – the Law Office of Julie Johnson... (more)

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CONTACT

800-957-9681

Robin Rubrecht Zegen Lawyer

Robin Rubrecht Zegen

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

In life, nothing imparts knowledge better than experience. Having endured a high conflict divorce that ended her twenty-year marriage, Robin Rubrecht... (more)

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CONTACT

800-917-3931

Donald Robert Jones Lawyer

Donald Robert Jones

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Lawsuit & Dispute, Medical Malpractice

Full-service law firm, dedicated to serving Texas and Nationwide, Practicing in wide areas of Law, kindly see our services.

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800-906-6530

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Dallas Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Dallas Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

SURVIVORS BENEFITS

An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disabil... (more...)
An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

PREMARITAL AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometim... (more...)
An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometimes whether alimony will be paid if the couple later divorces. Courts usually honor premarital agreements unless one person shows that the agreement was likely to promote divorce, was written with the intention of divorcing or was entered into unfairly. A premarital agreement may also be known as a 'prenuptial agreement.'

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.