Covington Misdemeanor Lawyer, Kentucky


Jeffrey David Brunk Lawyer

Jeffrey David Brunk

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Business, Accident & Injury

Jeffrey D. Brunk is a Northern Kentucky native attending High School at Covington Catholic. He received his bachelor’s degree from Thomas More Colle... (more)

John Charles Hayden Lawyer

John Charles Hayden

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, DUI-DWI, Estate, Divorce

The number of satisfied clients that Mr. Hayden has helped testify to the skill and commitment that he brings to his craft. Mr. Hayden has remained i... (more)

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800-969-4481

Brad  Fox Lawyer

Brad Fox

VERIFIED
Felony, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Child Custody
We are smart and aggressive trial lawyers seeking the best interest of our clients.

Brad was born and raised in Cincinnati. After graduating from Princeton High School he attended the College of Mount St. Joseph where he studied histo... (more)

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800-349-9791

Donald L Nageleisen Lawyer

Donald L Nageleisen

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

Since becoming a bar-certified attorney, Don has been fortunate to experience success in and out of the courtroom. Through his work ethic and dedicat... (more)

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Stuart P. Brown

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

James Richard Scott

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Michael P. Bartlett

Family Law, Real Estate, Contract, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Adam M. Russell

Industry Specialties, Criminal, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Gary J. Sergent

Divorce, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jonathan Mark Bruce

Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

EXPUNGE

To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the crimi... (more...)
To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the criminal records of a juvenile offender to be expunged when he reaches the age of majority, to allow him to begin his adult life with a clean record. Or, a company or government agency may routinely expunge out-of-date records to save storage space.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE

Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or j... (more...)
Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or jury may infer that the person committed the crime.

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.