Columbia RICO Act Lawyer, South Carolina


Stephen  Krzyston Lawyer

Stephen Krzyston

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Accident & Injury, Wrongful Death

We pride ourselves on offering client-centered, results-driven representation. That means we create a narrowly tailored strategy designed to help you ... (more)

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800-952-3840

Sybil  Rosado, Esq. Lawyer

Sybil Rosado, Esq.

VERIFIED
Civil & Human Rights, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Employment

Dr. Sybil Rosado is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina. Dr. Sybil Rosado received her J.D. from the Vanderbilt University Law School i... (more)

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CONTACT

803-999-2029

Jonathan M. Harvey Lawyer

Jonathan M. Harvey

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Felony

Mr. Jonathan Harvey served as an Assistant Solicitor in the Columbia/Richland County office of the Fifth Judicial Circuit Solicitor and as an Assistan... (more)

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CONTACT

800-293-4620

John Clarke Newton Lawyer

John Clarke Newton

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Social Security, Military, Workers' Compensation

We know legal issues can be intimidating. That’s why we’re here to help. Our attorneys are committed to helping other people. This typically invo... (more)

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G. Robin Alley Lawyer

G. Robin Alley

VERIFIED
Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce

The Law Firm of Isaacs & Alley is rated “AV Preeminent” by Martindale-Hubbell, which is the highest peer rating achievable for legal ability and e... (more)

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CONTACT

800-872-9260

Colin T.L. Spangler Lawyer

Colin T.L. Spangler

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Education, Landlord-Tenant, Litigation
Dedication. Passion. Excellence.

Colin is an experienced trial attorney handling Criminal Charges, Auto Accidents, Workers' Comp, and much more in Columbia, Lexington, and surrounding... (more)

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CONTACT

803-739-1824

Dayne C. Phillips Lawyer

Dayne C. Phillips

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony, White Collar Crime

Dayne Phillips is a lawyer in the state of South Carolina who handles cases in the area of criminal law. He has tried cases dealing with dui, gun ... (more)

James Spencer Verner Lawyer

James Spencer Verner

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate

James Verner is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina.

James S Meggs

Construction Contracts, Divorce, Criminal, Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

Louis H. Lang

Title Insurance, Litigation, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

BAILOR

Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in or... (more...)
Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in order to get it fixed would be a bailor.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

DIRECTED VERDICT

A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the... (more...)
A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the defendant. A directed verdict is usually made because the judge concludes the plaintiff has failed to offer the minimum amount of evidence to prove her case even if there were no opposition. In other words, the judge is saying that, as a matter of law, no reasonable jury could decide in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, a directed verdict is a judgement of acquittal for the defendant.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.