Columbia Divorce Lawyer, South Carolina


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

G. Robin Alley Lawyer

G. Robin Alley

VERIFIED
Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce

The Law Firm of Isaacs & Alley is rated “AV Preeminent” by Martindale-Hubbell, which is the highest peer rating achievable for legal ability and e... (more)

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James S Meggs

Construction Contracts, Divorce, Criminal, Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alex Thomas Postic

Workers' Compensation, Divorce, Farms, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mollie Du Priest-Taylor

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Andrew B. Farley

Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Custody & Visitation, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rebecca West

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Elizabeth Dickerson Branham

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

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David C. Shea

Farms, Family Law, Divorce, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Shawn L. Reeves

Deportation, Divorce, Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

John O. McDougall

Divorce, Child Custody, Property & Casualty, Accident & Injury, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME

An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median fam... (more...)
An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median family income figures for each state and for different family sizes. A debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income in his or her state must pass the means test in order to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must commit all disposable income to a five-year repayment plan if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Simpson v. Simpson

... (Father). In December 2004, Judge R. Wright Turbeville granted Mother and Father a divorce. As a shareholder/member of WR Simpson Farms, LLC, Husband was named a party to Mother and Father's divorce action. Husband ...

Eason v. Eason

... Justice WALLER. This is a cross-appeal from the family court's order which granted appellant/respondent Charlean L. Eason ("Wife") and respondent/appellant Fredrick W. Eason ("Husband") a divorce based on one year's continuous separation. ...

Marquez v. Caudill

... They had a rocky relationship and separated three times. Amy filed for divorce shortly after Katie's birth. ... They reconciled and then separated again in 2003. Stepfather left on Amy's request and filed for divorce and custody of the children. ...