Columbia Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, South Carolina


Sybil  Rosado, Esq. Lawyer

Sybil Rosado, Esq.

VERIFIED
Civil & Human Rights, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Employment

Dr. Sybil Rosado is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina. Dr. Sybil Rosado received her J.D. from the Vanderbilt University Law School i... (more)

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803-999-2029

G. Robin Alley Lawyer

G. Robin Alley

VERIFIED
Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce

The Law Firm of Isaacs & Alley is rated “AV Preeminent” by Martindale-Hubbell, which is the highest peer rating achievable for legal ability and e... (more)

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800-872-9260

Katherine Rose Myers Lawyer

Katherine Rose Myers

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Adoption, Child Support

Nice to meet you. I am a hard worker, a zealous advocate and a compassionate legal advisor. I don't hide from what the facts and law dictate in a cas... (more)

James Spencer Verner Lawyer

James Spencer Verner

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate

James Verner is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina.

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James S Meggs

Construction Contracts, Divorce, Criminal, Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

Emma Isabelle Bryson

Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Susan Edwards

Family Law, Pharmaceutical Product, Civil Rights, Premises Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert E. Hood

Family Law, Securities, Antitrust, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Alex Thomas Postic

Workers' Compensation, Divorce, Farms, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Preston "Pete" Strom

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

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