Columbia Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, South Carolina


Sybil  Rosado, Esq. Lawyer

Sybil Rosado, Esq.

VERIFIED
Civil & Human Rights, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Employment

Dr. Sybil Rosado is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina. Dr. Sybil Rosado received her J.D. from the Vanderbilt University Law School i... (more)

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803-999-2029

G. Robin Alley Lawyer

G. Robin Alley

VERIFIED
Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce

The Law Firm of Isaacs & Alley is rated “AV Preeminent” by Martindale-Hubbell, which is the highest peer rating achievable for legal ability and e... (more)

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800-872-9260

James Spencer Verner Lawyer

James Spencer Verner

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate

James Verner is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina.

James S Meggs

Construction Contracts, Divorce, Criminal, Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Emma Isabelle Bryson

Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Susan Edwards

Family Law, Pharmaceutical Product, Civil Rights, Premises Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert E. Hood

Family Law, Securities, Antitrust, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Alex Thomas Postic

Workers' Compensation, Divorce, Farms, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Preston "Pete" Strom

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Mollie Du Priest-Taylor

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.