Colorado Springs Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Colorado

Sponsored Law Firm


John M. Scorsine Lawyer

John M. Scorsine

VERIFIED
Criminal, Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Administrative Law

John M. Scorsine is the managing member of the Kanthaka Group. His primary focus is on assisting small and mid-sized businesses in developing the pote... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-916-5381

Angela C. Jones Lawyer

Angela C. Jones

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Wills & Probate, Lawsuit & Dispute

When dealing with the most sensitive of family issues you want to have a trusted adviser on your side. At Brighter Day Law, Angela C. Jones with her t... (more)

Thomas M. Condas Lawyer

Thomas M. Condas

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Divorce, Bad Faith Insurance, Estate

Tom began practicing in Colorado in early 2003. Prior to moving to Colorado, he practiced for 19 years and was a shareholder of, Hollins, Schechter & ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-824-2921

Damon  Cassens Lawyer

Damon Cassens

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Adoption, Permits

Educated and experienced. Providing high quality criminal defense and legal service since 1994. Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please desc... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-823-2170

Speak with Lawyer.com
R. Robert Clothier Lawyer

R. Robert Clothier

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption

R. Robert Clothier, born in Hollywood, California, December 18, 1958. Colorado resident since grade school. Admitted to the bar in 1983, Colorado Supr... (more)

Christopher  Nicolaysen Lawyer

Christopher Nicolaysen

Accident & Injury, Family Law, Personal Injury

Attorney, Christopher M. Nicolaysen focuses primarily on helping those injured in car accidents due to no fault of their own. The personal injury matt... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

719-299-5777

Stephen Hyde Swift

Adoption, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

James L English

Dispute Resolution, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Carrie E. Kelly

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Richard Radabaugh

DUI-DWI, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Colorado Springs Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Colorado Springs Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.