Churchton Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Maryland


Carol S Craig

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Barry J Dalnekoff

Traffic, Immigration, Family Law, Consumer Protection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark Kenneth Brooks

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Patrick J Callahan

Lawsuit & Dispute, Government, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years
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Deborah S Cook

Estate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Anthony John Danesi

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sandra Kay Meadows

Family Law
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  39 Years

Melanie K. Gerber

Government, Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Andrea Bell Baddour

Government, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Samuel Gerald Nazzaro

Employment, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'