Charleston Eminent Domain Lawyer, South Carolina, page 5


M. William Youngblood

Housing & Urban Development, Real Estate, Health Care Other, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

James Bernard Hood

Construction, Litigation, Lawsuit & Dispute, Medical Products & Devices
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jesse A. Kirchner

Construction, Real Estate, Litigation, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Siau Barr

Commercial Real Estate, Construction, Civil Rights, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Taylor Elizabeth Long

Litigation, Medical Malpractice, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

William H. Jordan

Commercial Real Estate, Corporate, Business & Trade, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  48 Years

Robert T. Lyles

Construction, Complex Litigation, Litigation, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Richard C. Burke

Construction, Corporate, Contract, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Robert M. Hadden

Construction, Securities, Corporate, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Mark C Fava

Real Estate, Transportation & Shipping, Wills & Probate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

WORK MADE FOR HIRE

A work created by an employee within the scope of employment or a work commissioned an author under contract. With a work for hire, the author and copyright own... (more...)
A work created by an employee within the scope of employment or a work commissioned an author under contract. With a work for hire, the author and copyright owner of a work is the person who pays for it, not the person who creates it. The premise of this principle is that a business that authorizes and pays for a work owns the rights to the work. There are two distinct ways that a work will be classified as 'made for hire.'the work is created by an employee within the scope of employment; or the work is commissioned, is the subject of a written agreement, and falls within a special group of categories (a contribution to a collective work, a part of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, a translation, a supplementary work, a compilation, an atlas, an instructional text, a test, or as answer material for a test). The work made for hire status of a work affects the length of copyright protection and termination rights.

TESTAMENTARY DISPOSITION

Leaving property in a will.

INCIDENTS OF OWNERSHIP

Any control over property. If you give away property but keep an incident of ownership--for example, you give away an apartment building but retain the right to... (more...)
Any control over property. If you give away property but keep an incident of ownership--for example, you give away an apartment building but retain the right to receive rent--then legally, no gift has been made. This distinction can be important if you're making large gifts to reduce your eventual estate tax.

ARBITRATION

A non-court procedure for resolving disputes using one or more neutral third parties -- called the arbitrator or arbitration panel. Arbitration uses rules of ev... (more...)
A non-court procedure for resolving disputes using one or more neutral third parties -- called the arbitrator or arbitration panel. Arbitration uses rules of evidence and procedure that are less formal than those followed in trial courts, which usually leads to a faster, less-expensive resolution. There are many types of arbitration in common use: Binding arbitration is similar to a court proceeding in that the arbitrator has the power to impose a decision, although this is sometimes limited by agreement -- for example, in 'hi-lo arbitration' the parties may agree in advance to a maximum and minimum award. In non-binding arbitration, the arbitrator can recommend but not impose a decision. Many contracts -- including those imposed on customers by many financial and healthcare organizations -- require mandatory arbitration in the event of a dispute. This may be reasonable when the arbitrator really is neutral, but is justifiably criticized when the large company that writes the contract is able to influence the choice of the arbitrator.

EVIDENCE

The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony... (more...)
The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony of witnesses, documents, photographs, items of damaged property, government records, videos and laboratory reports. Rules that are as strict as they are quirky and technical govern what types of evidence can be properly admitted as part of a trial. For example, the hearsay rule purports to prevent secondhand testimony of the 'he said, she said' variety, but the existence of dozens of exceptions often means that hairsplitting lawyers can find a way to introduce such testimony into evidence. See also admissible evidence, inadmissible evidence.

INVITEE

A business guest, or someone who enters property held open to members of the public, such as a visitor to a museum. Property owners must protect invitees from d... (more...)
A business guest, or someone who enters property held open to members of the public, such as a visitor to a museum. Property owners must protect invitees from dangers on the property. In an example of the perversion of legalese, social guests that you invite into your home are called 'licensees.'

LEASE

An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an ... (more...)
An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an apartment or business property) or personal property (such as a car or a boat). A lease should cover basic issues such as when the lease will begin and end, the rent or other costs, how payments should be made, and any restrictions on the use of the property. The property owner is often called the 'lessor,' and the person using the property is called the 'lessee.'

COOLING-OFF RULE

A rule that allows you to cancel a contract within a specified time period (typically three days) after signing it. Federal cooling-off rules apply this three-d... (more...)
A rule that allows you to cancel a contract within a specified time period (typically three days) after signing it. Federal cooling-off rules apply this three-day grace period to sales made door-to-door and anywhere other than a seller's normal place of business, such as at a trade show. Another federal cooling-off rule lets you cancel a home improvement loan or second mortgage within three days of signing. Various states have cooling-off rules that sometimes apply even longer cancellation periods to specific types of sales, such as dancing lessons and timeshares.

BEQUEST

The legal term for personal property (anything but real estate) left in a will.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Kiriakides v. SCH. DIST. OF GREENVILLE

... Kiriakides and the School District continued their negotiations for a voluntary sale until approximately April 2002, but when the negotiations proved unsuccessful, the School District began the process to acquire the property by eminent domain. ...

City of Hartsville v. SC MUN. INS.

... Inverse condemnation, condemnation, temporary taking, permanent taking, or any claim arising out of or in any way connected with the operation of the principles of eminent domain; adverse possession or dedication by adverse use. (emphasis added). ...

South Carolina Dept. of Transp. v. Hood

... We agree. Section 28-2-340 of the South Carolina Eminent Domain Procedure Act (the Act) sets forth the types of evidence admissible in condemnation proceedings to determine the value of the property sought to be condemned. SCCode Ann. § 28-2-340 (Supp.2007). ...