Cascadia Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Oregon


Emilia J. Gardner

Litigation, Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Danielle J. O'Brien

Family Law, Juvenile Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly Purdy

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

William A Allen

Adoption, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Kevin C. Gage

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Custody & Visitation, Child Custody, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

John R Wittwer

Power of Attorney, Real Estate, Estate Planning, Adoption, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

James L. McGehee

Adoption, Bankruptcy, Child Support, Consumer Protection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Thomas McHill

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite, Arbitration
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Mark A Taleff

Real Estate, Family Law
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  43 Years

Kristen L. Sager-Kottre

Government, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

GUARDIAN OF THE ESTATE

Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guar... (more...)
Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guardian of the estate may also be called a 'property guardian' or 'financial guardian.' See also guardian.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.