Toronto Estate Lawyer, Ontario, page 4


Appiah O. Boateng Lawyer

Appiah O. Boateng

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Immigration

Appiah O. Boateng is the owner of Ashanti Law located in the North York area in Toronto, Ontario. Appiah has been serving clients of diverse backgroun... (more)

John  Dadzie Lawyer

John Dadzie

VERIFIED
Immigration, Divorce & Family Law, Business

John Dadzie is a practicing lawyer in the province of Ontario.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-908-2711

George  Pappas Lawyer

George Pappas

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Pappas Law focuses on all areas of family law and our lawyers will advocate for you at all levels to achieve the best possible results in your case. F... (more)

Rachel Vanessa Radley Lawyer

Rachel Vanessa Radley

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law
Because Family is Important to You and Me

Rachel has more than 13 years of family law experience and has advocated for her clients at all court levels in Ontario including the Court of Justice... (more)

Rohan R. Haté Lawyer

Rohan R. Haté

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment

Rohan Haté is a partner at the law firm of McPhadden Samac Tuovi Haté LLP. Rohan received his Honours Bachelor of Arts degree from the Univers... (more)

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CONTACT

800-969-6421

Deepa  Tailor Lawyer

Deepa Tailor

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Criminal, Child Support, Employment

Deepa is the founder and Managing Director of Tailor Law Professional Corporation. She holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Toronto a... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-804-4761

Arman E. Hoque Lawyer

Arman E. Hoque

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Mental Health
Exceptional service, results-oriented, compassionate; Over 15 years experience

Arman Hoque holds a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Windsor in addition to a Master’s degree in Public Administration and a B.A. degree i... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-938-7041

Anamika  Sinha Lawyer

Anamika Sinha

VERIFIED
Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate, Immigration

Anamika Sinha provides dedicated and quality legal services for our clients in the areas of Drafting, Immigration, Collaborative Family law, Child and... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

437-991-2362

Christopher Henry Kozlowski Lawyer

Christopher Henry Kozlowski

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal, Immigration, Business

Kozlowski & Company was established in 1990 by managing lawyer Christopher H. Kozlowski. Kozlowski & Company concentrates its practice in the areas on... (more)

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CONTACT

800-318-3210

Olu  Ogunniyi Lawyer

Olu Ogunniyi

VERIFIED
Civil & Human Rights, Real Estate, Business, Litigation, Lawsuit & Dispute

Mr. Ogunniyi is qualified as a barrister and solicitor in Ontario (2002), Nigeria (1992) and admitted as a Solicitor in England and Wales (1998). H... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-261-5280

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LEGAL TERMS

DEATH TAXES

Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who... (more...)
Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who inherit property.

POUR-OVER WILL

A will that 'pours over' property into a trust when the will maker dies. Property left through the will must go through probate before it goes into the trust.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

PUBLISHED WORK

An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public o... (more...)
An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public on an unrestricted basis. It is thus possible to display a work, or distribute it with restrictions on disclosure of its contents, without actually 'publishing' it. Both published and unpublished works are entitled to copyright protection, but some of the rules differ.

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

ENTITY

An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from i... (more...)
An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from its individual members--for example, a corporation, partnership, trust, estate or government agency. The entity is treated like a person; it can function legally, be sued, and make decisions through agents.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.