Toronto DUI-DWI Lawyer, Ontario

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Caryma F Sa'd Lawyer

Caryma F Sa'd

VERIFIED
Criminal, Landlord-Tenant
Caryma Sa’d practices law in the Greater Toronto Area and beyond.

A major component of Caryma’s current work involves advocacy with respect to human rights and social justice issues. She writes and tweets extensive... (more)

Matthew Adam Friedberg Lawyer

Matthew Adam Friedberg

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Motor Vehicle, White Collar Crime

Matthew Friedberg has been a criminal defence lawyer his entire career. He has successfully represented thousands of clients charged with every type o... (more)

John Edward Charles Hyde Lawyer

John Edward Charles Hyde

VERIFIED
Employment, Labor Law

John-Edward C. Hyde is a Partner and Chair of the Management-side Labour Group, at Hyde HR Law. John is one of only 22 lawyers in Canada, certified as... (more)

Richard J. Aitken Lawyer

Richard J. Aitken

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Felony, Misdemeanor

Our winning team of experienced Ontario criminal lawyers provides hope and real solutions to those charged with DUI, DWI, impaired driving or other cr... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-814-0801

Noel Martin Gerald Daley Lawyer

Noel Martin Gerald Daley

Accident & Injury, Medical Malpractice, Insurance, Civil Rights, Sexual Harassment

Noel Daley's success in law has been clearly defined by his upbringing. Inspired by his mother, who put his brothers and him through law school, he ha... (more)

Jonathan  Mesiano-Crookston Lawyer

Jonathan Mesiano-Crookston

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Intellectual Property, Franchising, Business, Health Care

Jonathan Mesiano-Crookston (BScH Biochem, JD) is a partner with the boutique commercial litigation firm of Goldman Hine LLP and a registered patent an... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-681-3730

Peter  Manderville Lawyer

Peter Manderville

VERIFIED
Business, Lawsuit & Dispute, Employment, Real Estate

Peter is a former partner from Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP. He was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1990. He specializes in commercial and insurance ... (more)

Mihkel  Holmberg Lawyer

Mihkel Holmberg

VERIFIED
Corporate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Wills

Mihkel Holmberg’s practice encompasses a broad range of business practice including the purchase and sale of businesses, corporate and commercial le... (more)

Joel Stephen Guberman Lawyer

Joel Stephen Guberman

VERIFIED
Immigration

Joel has been practising immigration law for over 35 years, and he is certified by the Law Society of Ontario as a Specialist in Immigration and Citiz... (more)

Rohan R. Haté Lawyer

Rohan R. Haté

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment

Rohan Haté is a partner at the law firm of McPhadden Samac Tuovi Haté LLP. Rohan received his Honours Bachelor of Arts degree from the Universit... (more)

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CONTACT

800-969-6421

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LEGAL TERMS

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

HOT PURSUIT

An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and a... (more...)
An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and an officer has chased a suspect to a private house, the officer can forcefully enter the house in order to prevent the suspect from escaping or hiding or destroying evidence.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

BURDEN OF PROOF

A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convi... (more...)
A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convince the judge or jury 'by a preponderance of the evidence' that the plaintiff's version is true -- that is, over 50% of the believable evidence is in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, because a person's liberty is at stake, the government has a harder job, and must convince the judge or jury beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.