Halifax Estate Planning Lawyer, Nova Scotia, page 2


Includes: Gift Taxation

Madeleine Hearns

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Tina Hall

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Janet Stevenson

Immigration
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Natalie Clifford

Lawsuit & Dispute, Communication & Media Law, Wills & Probate, Wrongful Termination
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Blois Colpitts

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Bruce Outhouse

Administrative Law, Arbitration, Civil Rights, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  50 Years

Kaitlin Gauvin

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Seth Pickard-Tattrie

Dispute Resolution
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kent Clarke

Real Estate, Criminal, Litigation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Colin Bryson

Real Estate, Arbitration, Civil Rights, Employment Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

BYPASS TRUST

A trust designed to lessen a family's overall estate tax liability. An AB trust is the most popular kind of bypass trust.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

CONSERVATOR

Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of th... (more...)
Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of the estate.' One who takes care of personal matters, such as healthcare and living arrangements, is known as a 'conservator of the person.' Sometimes, one conservator is appointed to handle all these tasks. Depending on where you live, a conservator may also be called a guardian, committee or curator.

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

SPRINKLING TRUST

A trust that gives the person managing it (the trustee) the discretion to disburse its funds among the beneficiaries in any way he or she sees fit.

SWEARING MATCH

A case that turns on the word of one witness versus another. The outcome of a swearing match usually depends on whom the jury finds most trustworthy.

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

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