Burlington Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Vermont


Kenneth L. Geduldig Lawyer

Kenneth L. Geduldig

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate, Personal Injury

Kenneth Geduldig proudly serves Burlington, Vermont and the neighboring communities in the areas of criminal defense, divorce & family, estate, real e... (more)

Amanda L. Ahmadi

Family Law, Collaborative Law, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Caryn E. Waxman

Family Law, Collaborative Law, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amber L. Barber

Family Law, Collaborative Law, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           
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John L. Pacht

Family Law, Divorce, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amber Leah Barber

Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Priscilla Bondy Dubé

Mediation, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas Z. Carlson

Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard I. Damalouji

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mary P Kehoe

Personal Injury, Bankruptcy, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Burlington Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Burlington Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

ISSUE

A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called... (more...)
A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called 'lineal descendants.'

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.