Brownsville Divorce Lawyer, Oregon


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Kimberly Purdy

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sarah R Saul Dessert

Divorce & Family Law, Power of Attorney, Divorce, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joel Howe

Litigation, Estate, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Jennifer Nash

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Divorce, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Kyle D Edmonds

Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

James Stanley Baldock

Real Estate, Estate, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert K Naslund

Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  55 Years

Elliott Farren

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Sara Angeletti

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark A Wolf

Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

ISSUE

A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called... (more...)
A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called 'lineal descendants.'

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Marriage of Dahl and Angle

... The agreement with the IVF facility provided, among other things, that (1) the frozen embryos would not be released from storage without the parties' mutual written consent; (2) in the event of divorce, legal ownership of the stored embryos was to be determined in a property 840 ...

Saldivar v. Roberts

... and professionally. In March, 2008, my wife filed divorce proceedings. I did ... There were numerous letters sent to me in my divorce case that I have been asked to sign for to prove receipt around the time I was served. I have just recently ...

VOTAW v. Department of Revenue

... IRC section 215 [3] permits a taxpayer to deduct payments paid during a tax year for alimony as defined in IRC section 71. Alimony is defined as "any payment in cash if—. "(A) such payment is received by (or on behalf of) a spouse under a divorce or separation instrument,. ...

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