Bloomington DUI-DWI Lawyer, Indiana

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Andrew Stephen Roesener

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Federal, Felony
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Andrew Joseph Baldwin

Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Civil & Human Rights
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Brady Jay Lory

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Dorie Ann Maryan

White Collar Crime, Juvenile Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, DUI-DWI
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Eric Norman Hayes

Divorce, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Guy Henry Haskell

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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James Lewis Hillery

Products Liability, Immigration, Criminal, Wrongful Death, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Jeffrey Raymond Norris

Real Estate, Estate, DUI-DWI, Civil & Human Rights, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Kelly Renee Thompson

Workers' Compensation, Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark Douglas Shaver

Motor Vehicle, Divorce & Family Law, Felony, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

EXPUNGE

To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the crimi... (more...)
To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the criminal records of a juvenile offender to be expunged when he reaches the age of majority, to allow him to begin his adult life with a clean record. Or, a company or government agency may routinely expunge out-of-date records to save storage space.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

AGGRAVATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, th... (more...)
Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, the crime of aggravated assault is a physical attack made worse because it is committed with a dangerous weapon, results in severe bodily injury or is made in conjunction with another serious crime. Aggravated assault is usually considered a felony, punishable by a prison sentence.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Guy v. COM'R, BUREAU OF MOTOR VEHICLES

... We therefore vacate the trial court's order. Facts and Procedural History. In 2001 Guy lived in Florida. He was required by the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles ("Florida DMV") to attend a lifetime DUI school as a condition of maintaining his Florida driver license. Tr. p. 5. ...

Hamilton v. State

... victims. This was a single occurrence involving a single victim. Hamilton does have a criminal history but the presentence report reveals only two known convictions, a 1982 felony robbery and a 2002 misdemeanor DUI. Finally ...

Guy v. COMMISSIONER, INDIANA BUREAU OF MOTOR VEHICLES

... We therefore vacate the trial court's order. Facts and Procedural History. In 2001 Guy lived in Florida. He was required by the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles ("Florida DMV") to attend a lifetime DUI school as a condition of maintaining his Florida driver license. Tr. p. 5. ...