Baton Rouge Misdemeanor Lawyer, Louisiana

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Gregory J Miller Lawyer

Gregory J Miller

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Accident & Injury, Employment, Workers' Compensation, Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Criminal

Mr. Miller has practiced extensively and successfully litigated such claims throughout the state. He is admitted to all Louisiana Federal District ... (more)

Drew  Louviere Lawyer

Drew Louviere

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Criminal, Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury
Years of Experience at a Reasonable Price

Attorney Drew Louviere of Drew M. Louviere Pro Law Corp assists residents with DWI charges in and around East Baton Rouge County including Baton Rouge... (more)

Kathryn Jakuback Burke Lawyer

Kathryn Jakuback Burke

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Criminal, Family Law, Immigration, Federal Appellate Practice, State Appellate Practice

Kathryn graduated from LSU’s Paul M. Hebert Law Center in 2017. During law school she was an active participant in Moot Court and Trial Advocacy. Du... (more)

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James P Manasseh Lawyer

James P Manasseh

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Criminal, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, Litigation
Managing Partner of Litigation Intensive Medium Size Law Firm.

The managing partner of the largest criminal defense intensive law firm in Louisiana, Manasseh has represented more than 12,000 clients over a twenty-... (more)

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Jacob Guice Longman Lawyer

Jacob Guice Longman

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Criminal, Felony, RICO Act, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Jacob is a 2017 graduate of the Paul M. Hebert Law Center. During law school, he participated in Trial Advocacy and Moot Court, was President of the S... (more)

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800-951-8730

Jarrett  Ambeau Lawyer

Jarrett Ambeau

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, White Collar Crime, Federal, Misdemeanor
Experienced criminal defense and personal injury litigation in Gonzales and Baton Rouge.

The Ambeau Law Firm represents clients in felony criminal matters from DWI defense, to theft, to the most serious crimes. In these cases you need an a... (more)

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Richard P Ieyoub

Dispute Resolution, Complex Litigation, Criminal, DUI-DWI
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Gracella Gail Simmons

Dispute Resolution, Arbitration, Criminal, Animal Bite
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Kelly Edward Balfour

Criminal, Personal Injury, Transportation & Shipping
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John Wesley Tilly

Animal Bite, Criminal, Bad Faith, Chemical & Cosmetics
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LEGAL TERMS

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

HOT PURSUIT

An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and a... (more...)
An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and an officer has chased a suspect to a private house, the officer can forcefully enter the house in order to prevent the suspect from escaping or hiding or destroying evidence.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

GRAND JURY

In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the f... (more...)
In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the first step, after arrest, in any formal prosecution of a felony.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).