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Gregory J Miller Lawyer

Gregory J Miller

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Accident & Injury, Employment, Workers' Compensation, Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Criminal

Mr. Miller has practiced extensively and successfully litigated such claims throughout the state. He is admitted to all Louisiana Federal District ... (more)

Drew  Louviere Lawyer

Drew Louviere

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Criminal, Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury
Years of Experience at a Reasonable Price

Attorney Drew Louviere of Drew M. Louviere Pro Law Corp assists residents with DWI charges in and around East Baton Rouge County including Baton Rouge... (more)

Kathryn Jakuback Burke Lawyer

Kathryn Jakuback Burke

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Criminal, Family Law, Immigration, Federal Appellate Practice, State Appellate Practice

Kathryn graduated from LSU’s Paul M. Hebert Law Center in 2017. During law school she was an active participant in Moot Court and Trial Advocacy. Du... (more)

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James P Manasseh Lawyer

James P Manasseh

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Criminal, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, Litigation
Managing Partner of Litigation Intensive Medium Size Law Firm.

The managing partner of the largest criminal defense intensive law firm in Louisiana, Manasseh has represented more than 12,000 clients over a twenty-... (more)

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Jacob Guice Longman Lawyer

Jacob Guice Longman

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, RICO Act, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Jacob is a 2017 graduate of the Paul M. Hebert Law Center. During law school, he participated in Trial Advocacy and Moot Court, was President of the S... (more)

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800-951-8730

Jarrett  Ambeau Lawyer

Jarrett Ambeau

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, White Collar Crime, Federal, Misdemeanor
Experienced criminal defense and personal injury litigation in Gonzales and Baton Rouge.

The Ambeau Law Firm represents clients in felony criminal matters from DWI defense, to theft, to the most serious crimes. In these cases you need an a... (more)

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800-940-3710

Richard P Ieyoub

Dispute Resolution, Complex Litigation, Criminal, DUI-DWI
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Gracella Gail Simmons

Dispute Resolution, Arbitration, Criminal, Animal Bite
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Kelly Edward Balfour

Criminal, Personal Injury, Transportation & Shipping
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John Wesley Tilly

Animal Bite, Criminal, Bad Faith, Chemical & Cosmetics
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LEGAL TERMS

MENS REA

The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental s... (more...)
The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental state (the mens rea). The mens rea of robbery, for example, is the intent to permanently deprive the owner of his property.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

INDECENT EXPOSURE

Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that ... (more...)
Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that his act may be seen by others--for example, in a public place or through an open window--and that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. Indecent exposure is considered a misdemeanor in most states.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

DIRECTED VERDICT

A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the... (more...)
A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the defendant. A directed verdict is usually made because the judge concludes the plaintiff has failed to offer the minimum amount of evidence to prove her case even if there were no opposition. In other words, the judge is saying that, as a matter of law, no reasonable jury could decide in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, a directed verdict is a judgement of acquittal for the defendant.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.