Baton Rouge Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Louisiana


Drew  Louviere Lawyer

Drew Louviere

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury
Years of Experience at a Reasonable Price

Attorney Drew Louviere of Drew M. Louviere Pro Law Corp assists residents with DWI charges in and around East Baton Rouge County including Baton Rouge... (more)

Michael E. Theriot Lawyer

Michael E. Theriot

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Education, Slip & Fall Accident

Graduated from LSU in 1978 (Bachelor of Arts in Political Science) Worked with disabled and handicapped young adults through the State of Louisian... (more)

Mark  Lazarre Lawyer

Mark Lazarre

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Estate, Accident & Injury

Based in Baton Rouge, Mark Lazarre of the Lazarre Law Firm provides exceptional legal representation to businesses and individuals across Louisiana. B... (more)

Wyman Earl Bankston Lawyer

Wyman Earl Bankston

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law

Wyman spent the first four years of his practice with a national firm primarily representing insurance companies in losses sustained as a result of Hu... (more)

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Steve LeBlanc

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey S. Wittenbrink

Litigation, Intellectual Property, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Goldie C Domingue

International, Government Agencies, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Wesley Ryan Bailey

Administrative Law, Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Americans with Disabilities Act
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Anne Richey Myles

Family Law, Estate Planning, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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George E Downing

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

GUARDIAN

An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a '... (more...)
An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a 'guardian of the estate.' An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical and educational needs, is called a 'guardian of the person.' Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.