Baltimore Misdemeanor Lawyer, Maryland

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Seth  Okin Lawyer

Seth Okin

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor

Seth Okin is a lawyer in the state of Maryland who focuses on criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, domestic violence, drug char... (more)

Oleg  Fastovsky Lawyer

Oleg Fastovsky

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor

Oleg Fastovsky is a lawyer in the state of Maryland who handles Criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, drug charges, DUI, felon... (more)

Charles  Waechter Lawyer

Charles Waechter

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Internet

Annapolis Criminal Defense Law Firm If you face criminal charges, an experienced and respected defense lawyer can help protect your rights, evaluat... (more)

Wendy A. Cartwright Lawyer

Wendy A. Cartwright

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Misdemeanor, Felony, Contract, Juvenile Law

I have had the privilege of being in private law practice in Maryland for the last 19 years. I was a judicial law clerk for the Honorable Howard S. Ch... (more)

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Kush  Arora Lawyer

Kush Arora

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Kush Arora is a lawyer in the state of Maryland who focuses on Criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, DUI, drug charges, bur... (more)

Paula Mattson-Sarli

Administrative Law, Criminal, Misdemeanor, Traffic
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Raymond Nicholas

Accident & Injury, Securities, Misdemeanor, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

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Jason A. Kerpelman

Traffic, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Robert A. Siegel

Traffic, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Ernest Gregory Lardieri

Motor Vehicle, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

BAILOR

Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in or... (more...)
Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in order to get it fixed would be a bailor.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

McCloud v. State Police

... In addition to the criteria for issuing a permit, PS § 5-306(a), Maryland law also provides that a person may not possess a handgun if the person has been convicted of a "disqualifying crime," which includes "a violation classified as a misdemeanor in the State that carries a ...

McCloud v. Department of State Police

... In addition to the criteria for issuing a permit, PS § 5-306 (a), Maryland law also provides that a person may not possess a handgun if the person has been convicted of a "disqualifying crime," which includes "a violation classified as a misdemeanor in the State that carries a ...

Stubbs v. State

... Section 7-104(g) of the Criminal Law Article, in pertinent part, provides: (2) Except as provided in paragraphs (3) and (4) of this subsection, a person convicted of theft of property or services with a value of less than $500, is guilty of a misdemeanor and: ...