Baltimore Estate Lawyer, Maryland

Sponsored Law Firm


Michael I Gordon Lawyer

Michael I Gordon

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Real Estate, Business, Transactions, Mediation

Michael Gordon has been practicing law in Maryland for more than 50 years. He is highly regarded by peers and colleagues and well distinguished by pro... (more)

Brooke  Schumm Lawyer

Brooke Schumm

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Intellectual Property, Estate, Tax

Brooke Schumm is a practicing lawyer in the state of Maryland. Mr. Schumm received his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1980.

Guana E. Williams Lawyer

Guana E. Williams

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Consumer Bankruptcy, Wills, Personal Injury

Attorney Williams is highly qualified to meet the challenges that difficult cases present. She serves clients in the Baltimore area with specialties i... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-749-1830

Rob  Goldman Lawyer

Rob Goldman

VERIFIED
Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Real Estate

We bring you Peace of Mind. We demonstrate our commitment to you through good communication, sound advice, thoughtful planning, effective implementati... (more)

Speak with Lawyer.com
Timothy  Gunning Lawyer

Timothy Gunning

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Business, Real Estate, Estate
Maryland Super Lawyer since 2008

For nearly 30 years clients have trusted Timothy Gunning to resolve the biggest legal problems in their lives. Mr. Gunning has represented people and ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

410-296-5960

Nomiki B. Weitzel Lawyer

Nomiki B. Weitzel

VERIFIED
Estate, Elder Law, Health Care, Conveyancing

Nomiki Bouloubassis Weitzel graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law. She served as a trust officer for the Mercantile-Safe Deposit an... (more)

Troy L Nussbaum Lawyer

Troy L Nussbaum

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Divorce, Estate, Criminal

Troy Nussbaum is a member of the Maryland Bar practicing in the State of Maryland. Mr. Nussbaum serves residents of Anne Arundel County, Howard County... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-813-7181

Kaitlyn P. Tauber Lawyer

Kaitlyn P. Tauber

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Real Estate, Estate, Business

Ms. Tauber grew up in Linthicum, MD and graduated Cum Laude from the University of Baltimore in 2013. She received her Juris Doctor from the Universit... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-974-5791

Michelle Antoinette Greer Lawyer

Michelle Antoinette Greer

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Business, Lawsuit & Dispute, Power of Attorney

Michelle A. Greer has been a certified paralegal for 20 years, and currently works as an attorney and licensed mediator for the Law Office of Jeffrey ... (more)

Richard Todd Stansbury Lawyer

Richard Todd Stansbury

VERIFIED
Business, Real Estate, Estate, Tax, Elder Law

Richard T. Stansbury, P.A. in Hunt Valley, Maryland serves individuals and businesses primarily in the Baltimore, Annapolis, Washington D.C. and Easte... (more)

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Baltimore Estate Lawyers and Baltimore Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

CURATOR

See conservator.

ESTATE PLANNING

The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your... (more...)
The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your estate may involve making a will, living trust, healthcare directives, durable power of attorney for finances or other documents.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Pautsch v. MARYLAND REAL ESTATE COM'N

16 A.3d 977 (2011). 418 Md. 587. JOEL PAUTSCH v. MARYLAND REAL ESTATE COM'N. Pet. Docket No. 619. Court of Appeals of Maryland. Granted April 22, 2011. Petition for Writ of Certiorari granted.

Attorney Grievance v. Kendrick

... 13, 1994, violated Rules 1.1 (Competence), [2] 1.3 (Diligence), [3] 1.5 (Fees), [4] 1.15 (Safekeeping Property), [5] and 8.4 (Misconduct) [6] of the Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct ("MRPC") in her representation as Co-Personal Representative of the Estate of Judith Nina ...

Kroll v. Fisher

... Circuit Court for Allegany County. Appellee is the personal representative of the estate of Mary D. Kroll ("Ms. Kroll"), and prior to Ms. Kroll's death, appellee acted as attorney-in-fact for Ms. Kroll. In his complaint, appellant alleged ...