Baltimore Divorce Lawyer, Maryland


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Jayson Aaron Soobitsky Lawyer

Jayson Aaron Soobitsky

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Traffic

At the Law Offices of Jayson A. Soobitsky, P.A., our clients come first. Every client is treated with courtesy and respect. Our expertise and integrit... (more)

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CONTACT

800-753-1761

Gretchen K. Athias-White Lawyer

Gretchen K. Athias-White

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Family Law

Gretchen Athias-White has been serving the family law needs of Bowie, MD for 21 years.

Tammy  Begun Lawyer

Tammy Begun

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody
Stuart  Skok Lawyer

Stuart Skok

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody

Houlon, Berman, Bergman, Finci, Levenstein & Skok, LLC’s lawyers in Maryland are reputed for their commitment to professional and personal legal ser... (more)

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Alan  Solomon Lawyer

Alan Solomon

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Criminal, Estate

Facing a serious legal issue? Scared and unsure of how to proceed? Worried your attorney won’t have the experience you need to see you through to a ... (more)

Susan Kirwan

Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

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David D. Nowak

Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Beth Jackson Day

Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Benjamin Cutter Marcoux

Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Child Support, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Marshall Knight

Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite, Criminal, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Janusz v. Gilliam

... In their Agreement, which was incorporated, but not merged, into the judgment of divorce, the parties agreed that Mr. Gilliam would maintain in effect his survivor's annuity [1] with the federal Civil Service Retirement System, for the benefit of Ms. Janusz. ...

Aleem v. Aleem

... CATHELL, J. Farah Aleem filed suit for a limited divorce from her husband, Irfan Aleem in the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. The husband thereafter filed an Answer and Counterclaim. He raised no jurisdictional objections. ...

Attorney Grievance v. Elmendorf

... On the afternoon of July 28, 2003, Ms. McCarthy and the Respondent exchanged a series of electronic mail messages in which Ms. McCarthy sought information about grounds for divorce. ... Mr. Almand was now representing Ms. Dodson in connection with her divorce. ...