Annapolis Misdemeanor Lawyer, Maryland

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Charles  Waechter Lawyer

Charles Waechter

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Internet

Annapolis Criminal Defense Law Firm If you face criminal charges, an experienced and respected defense lawyer can help protect your rights, evaluat... (more)

Kush  Arora Lawyer

Kush Arora

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Kush Arora is a lawyer in the state of Maryland who focuses on Criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, DUI, drug charges, bur... (more)

Oleg  Fastovsky Lawyer

Oleg Fastovsky

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor

Oleg Fastovsky is a lawyer in the state of Maryland who handles Criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, drug charges, DUI, felon... (more)

Seth  Okin Lawyer

Seth Okin

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor

Seth Okin is a lawyer in the state of Maryland who focuses on criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, domestic violence, drug char... (more)

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Wendy A. Cartwright Lawyer

Wendy A. Cartwright

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Misdemeanor, Felony, Contract, Juvenile Law

I have had the privilege of being in private law practice in Maryland for the last 19 years. I was a judicial law clerk for the Honorable Howard S. Ch... (more)

Paula Mattson-Sarli

Administrative Law, Criminal, Misdemeanor, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Adam Daniel Perrelli

Criminal, Accident & Injury, Misdemeanor, Malpractice, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andreas N Akaras

Traffic, Immigration, Employment, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Asher Weinberg

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Barrett Ryan Schultz

Motor Vehicle, Misdemeanor, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE

Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or j... (more...)
Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or jury may infer that the person committed the crime.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

PROSECUTE

When a local District Attorney, state Attorney General or federal United States Attorney brings a criminal case against a defendant.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

McCloud v. State Police

... In addition to the criteria for issuing a permit, PS § 5-306(a), Maryland law also provides that a person may not possess a handgun if the person has been convicted of a "disqualifying crime," which includes "a violation classified as a misdemeanor in the State that carries a ...

McCloud v. Department of State Police

... In addition to the criteria for issuing a permit, PS § 5-306 (a), Maryland law also provides that a person may not possess a handgun if the person has been convicted of a "disqualifying crime," which includes "a violation classified as a misdemeanor in the State that carries a ...

Stubbs v. State

... Section 7-104(g) of the Criminal Law Article, in pertinent part, provides: (2) Except as provided in paragraphs (3) and (4) of this subsection, a person convicted of theft of property or services with a value of less than $500, is guilty of a misdemeanor and: ...