Ann Arbor Estate Planning Lawyer, Michigan


Includes: Gift Taxation

Jay D. Mukerji Lawyer

Jay D. Mukerji

VERIFIED
Estate, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney, Real Estate

Jay's professional background and diverse experience provide a wealth of knowledge in many areas of personal and business matters. After completing... (more)

Angelique Marie Neal

Corporate Tax, Gift Taxation, Income Tax, Payroll Taxes
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sandra K. Alexander

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Business, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Debra S. Keehn

Juvenile Law, Mediation, Estate Planning, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Daniel J. Cramer

Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Paul R. Fransway

Litigation, Intellectual Property, Gift Taxation, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Paul R. Fransway

Litigation, Intellectual Property, Gift Taxation, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Michael David Shelton

Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Andrew Wayne Stumpff

International Tax, Gift Taxation, Employee Rights, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

Marta A. Manildi

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

FAMILY POT TRUST

See pot trust.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

ADMINISTRATOR

A person appointed by a probate court to handle the distribution of property of someone who has died without a will, or with a will that fails to name someone t... (more...)
A person appointed by a probate court to handle the distribution of property of someone who has died without a will, or with a will that fails to name someone to carry out this task. administrator ad litem A person appointed by a probate court to represent an estate during a lawsuit. (Ad litem is Latin for 'during the litigation.') An administrator ad litem is appointed only if there is no existing executor or administrator of the estate, or if the executor or administrator has conflicting interests. For example, Jerry's will leaves most of his property to his brother, Jeff, and also names Jeff as executor of the will. But Jerry's sister, Janine, feels that Jerry made the will under improper pressure from Jeff, and brings a lawsuit to challenge it. The court appoints an administrator ad litem to represent Jerry's estate while the lawsuit is in progress. Also known as administrator ad prosequendum, meaning administrator 'during the prosecution.' administrator ad prosequendum See administrator ad litem.administrator cum testamento annexo See administrator with will annexed. administrator de bonis non (DBN) Latin for 'administrator of goods not administered.' This term refers to the person appointed by a probate court to finish probate proceedings when the executor or previous administrator can't finish the job.administrator de bonis non cum testamento annexo (DBNCTA) A baffling title for an administrator appointed by a probate court to take over probate proceedings when the named executor dies, leaving the job unfinished.administrator pendente lite Latin for 'administrator pending litigation.' This term refers to the person appointed by a court to begin probate proceedings during a lawsuit that challenges the will. The administrator pendente lite takes an inventory of the deceased person's property and handles the business affairs of the estate until the dispute is settled. Also called a special administrator.administrator with will annexed An administrator who takes the place of an executor under a will. The administrator steps in either when a will fails to nominate an executor or the named executor is unable to serve. Also called administrator cum testamento annexo or CTA, the Latin version of 'with the will annexed.'

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

SWEARING MATCH

A case that turns on the word of one witness versus another. The outcome of a swearing match usually depends on whom the jury finds most trustworthy.

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

IN RE ESTATE OF SOUTHWORTH

... Margaret Noe. In February 2005, the decedent consulted Noe for estate planning advice. The ... estate plan. The representative offered to meet with the decedent and answer any questions regarding estate planning and the college. Despite ...

IN RE HAYES

... In addition, the survivor may amend or revoke the trust." [Brief at 8, citing Michigan Estate Planning Handbook (Carol J. Karr ed., ICLE 2d ed, 2006), ch 22, § 22.4.]. ... [Michigan Estate Planning Handbook (Carol J. Karr ed., ICLE 2d ed, 2006), ch 22, § 22.4.]. ...

Charfoos v. Schultz

... including trust documents, as in this case. Bullis v Downes, 240 Mich App 462, 468; 612 NW2d 435 (2000) (no distinction made among varieties of modern estate planning tools). Here, the trial court prohibited plaintiffs from ...