Anchorage Criminal Lawyer, Alaska

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Allen N. Dayan Lawyer

Allen N. Dayan

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony, White Collar Crime

Allen Dayan is a practicing lawyer in the state of Alaska specializing in Criminal Defense. Mr. Dayan received his J.D. from the University of Oregon.

Steven J. Priddle Lawyer

Steven J. Priddle

VERIFIED
Criminal, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI

Attorney Priddle has extensive experience representing clients in a variety of DUI, domestic violence and divorce cases. As a DUI attorney, a criminal... (more)

Michael A. Moberly Lawyer

Michael A. Moberly

VERIFIED
Criminal, Environmental Law Other, Litigation, Civil Rights

Michael Moberly handles litigation cases statewide, both criminal and civil. Presently, his caseload is primarily criminal, emphasizing serious feloni... (more)

James Alan Wendt Lawyer

James Alan Wendt

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Medical Malpractice, Aviation, Personal Injury

Attorney James Wendt was born in New York City and raised in northern New Jersey. Mr. Wendt was educated at Northeastern University and the State Univ... (more)

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907-258-9100

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Stephen G. Merrill Lawyer

Stephen G. Merrill

VERIFIED
Business, Car Accident, Toxic Mold & Tort, Slip & Fall Accident, White Collar Crime

Stephen Merrill is a well-known trial attorney with a strong background in the fundamentals. In the midst of a successful career in Norfolk, Virginia,... (more)

Dan  Allan Lawyer

Dan Allan

VERIFIED
Criminal, Juvenile Law, Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Estate

In 30+ years of practicing law, Mr. Allan has successfully defended numerous citizens who have been wrongly charged by the government. Prosecuted five... (more)

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CONTACT

907-344-8851

Jeremy M. Collier Lawyer

Jeremy M. Collier

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury

A life-long Alaskan, I grew up right here in the valley. I attended college and law school on scholarship, graduating from the Thomas M. Cooley Law Sc... (more)

Ian Wheeles

Family Law, Criminal, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rex Lamont Butler

Federal, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer Stuart Henderson

Animal Bite, Criminal, Complex Litigation, Employment Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Anchorage Criminal Lawyers and Anchorage Criminal Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Criminal practice areas such as DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act, White Collar Crime and Traffic matters.

LEGAL TERMS

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

ARRAIGNMENT

A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters... (more...)
A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters often handled at the arraignment are arranging for the appointment of a lawyer to represent the defendant and the setting of bail.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

EXPUNGE

To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the crimi... (more...)
To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the criminal records of a juvenile offender to be expunged when he reaches the age of majority, to allow him to begin his adult life with a clean record. Or, a company or government agency may routinely expunge out-of-date records to save storage space.

BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT

The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced '... (more...)
The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced 'to a moral certainty.' The jury must be convinced that the defendant committed each element of the crime before returning a guilty verdict.

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).

BURDEN OF PROOF

A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convi... (more...)
A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convince the judge or jury 'by a preponderance of the evidence' that the plaintiff's version is true -- that is, over 50% of the believable evidence is in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, because a person's liberty is at stake, the government has a harder job, and must convince the judge or jury beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty.

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Doe v. State

... Moreover, the state asserts that there is no evidence that Alaskans have directed any wrath at convicted sex offenders and notes that the sex offender registry website warns viewers about using registry information to commit a criminal act. ... 5. Application only to criminal behavior. ...

Phillips v. State

... impersonation. [4] In this appeal, Phillips argues that 1150 the trial court should have entered acquittals on his charges of criminal impersonation. We ... Phillips now appeals. Sufficiency of the Evidence of Criminal Impersonation. Phillips argues ...

State v. Galbraith

... Why the State may not challenge Judge Downes. This appeal was originally filed as an expedited appeal under Appellate Rule 216. Peremptory challenge appeals are included in this rule, but only when they are filed by a criminal defendant. ...