Albuquerque Criminal Lawyer, New Mexico

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Simon A. Kubiak Lawyer

Simon A. Kubiak

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Slip & Fall Accident, Car Accident
Licensed in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico

Simon A. Kubiak, Attorney at Law, is dedicated to the defense of DWI cases in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and will fight to protect your rights and do ev... (more)

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Leonard J. Foster Lawyer

Leonard J. Foster

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Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, State Trial Practice, Native People
The Leonard J. Foster Law Firm accepts cases involving Criminal Law, Injury, & Native Peoples

Leonard J. Foster accepts cases involving Personal Injury, Criminal Law, Business Law, & Native Peoples and is an active Lawyer practicing in Albuquer... (more)

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800-925-8021

Cynthia  Armijo Lawyer

Cynthia Armijo

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic

Eighteen years of experience in criminal law: Former Assistant District Attorney responsible for training new attorneys how to prosecute domestic v... (more)

Jon Joseph Litty Lawyer

Jon Joseph Litty

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Rachel Walker Al-Yasi Lawyer

Rachel Walker Al-Yasi

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor

Criminal Lawyer proudly serving Albuquerque, New Mexico and the surrounding areas. Please call 800-578-4330 to speak with Rachel Walker Al-Yasi today.... (more)

Elizabeth Valentine Han Lawyer

Elizabeth Valentine Han

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Elizabeth Valentine (V.) Han is the owner and sole practitioner at the Law Office of Elizabeth V. Han. Professionally, she obtained her license to... (more)

Saul Francis Goodman Lawyer

Saul Francis Goodman

Criminal, Civil & Human Rights, Felony, Accident & Injury
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Boglarka  Foghi Lawyer

Boglarka Foghi

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business

The Foghi Law Firm was founded by Boglarka Foghi in 2009, specializing in criminal defense, family law, and business law. Managing Partner Boglarka F... (more)

Matthew A. Vance

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Personal Injury, Car Accident
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Margaret A Graham

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LEGAL TERMS

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

INDECENT EXPOSURE

Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that ... (more...)
Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that his act may be seen by others--for example, in a public place or through an open window--and that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. Indecent exposure is considered a misdemeanor in most states.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Schoonmaker

... Id. ¶ 3. Defendant was eighteen at the time and had no criminal record. ... '" (quoting ABA Standards for Criminal Justice, The Defense Function Standard 4-4.1 (2d ed.1986))). Prejudice. {35} Normally it is the defendant's burden to show both incompetence and prejudice. ...

State v. Garza

... The State filed a criminal complaint in magistrate court on June 29, 2006, and Defendant was released on the same day. ... L.Rev. 1376, 1378 (1972); see 5 Wayne R. LaFave et al., Criminal Procedure § 18.1(b) (3d ed. 2007) ("[I]t is rather misleading to say ... ...

State v. Padilla

... {11} We look first to general principles underlying criminal law to inform our analysis. Criminal liability is typically defined by the conduct of the accused, not the conduct of the police officer or the law enforcement agency tasked to enforce the criminal code. ...